Northern Drive to St Lucy

Northern Drive to St Lucy
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Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Comments on "Explorer" and "Feelings"

Explorer

I shall search for that special one
for writing is too slow
consider any age range that is not too low
without any more ado
I shall surf the net
and ignore the fact I have lit a cigarette

I shall posts pictures on facebook
and twitter in between
learn very fast those chatting rules
sitting on the computer stroking those keys
holding down the mouse
chatting with laughter and tease

Posting my profile forms part of my plan
on my to do list
hoping my hobby brings me a man
that pens his thoughts in prose
with a watermark rose.

July 2012

----------------------------


Feelings

To me you are so special ...     tossing toffeesmiles doolight my star;
            important... you make me feel        thinking of you
keeps me smiling – He-he!
because of the joys we are sharing...

Gr-r-r – Yesterday I was sad – but, but
your email today makes me very glad

Gee wiz!
our plans for this yuletide season        send thrills
                                                                                     down my spine
thinking of that chalet
                        down-under
                                                and a la carte...holy grill...

Hmm –   oceans keeping us apart

Gr-r-r– so what a lonely soul
 must do          with loneliness soliloquy
                        B-r-r – ponders miserably...you not here

ivyvines of love            threading
                        our hearts
                                     soul so enmeshed
                                                            with starlights...zzzz

(July 2012)


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The poems “Feelings” and “Explorer fall under the genre of a soliloquy. In a poem whereby one speaks to oneself is called a soliloquy. The poetic soliloquy gives the illusion of unspoken reflections. These two poems have open structures and therefore fall under the category of Free Verse another term for Open Form. Poems with open form structures replace formalism” with “structuralism” that allows poets to manipulate traditional patterns used in Closed Form poetry. In so doing, the poets are free to inject into their poems linguistic inventiveness, to tinker with punctuation, spelling, the use of non-verbal sounds (e.g. Gr-r-r, zzzz, hmm) and syntax in order to create their new and highly idiosyncratic means of poetic expression.

The American poet, Edward Estlin Cummings, born in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1844 was a genius at manipulating traditional forms of poetry as he used poems as visual objects and promoted the sheer playfulness with language. An example of his abandonment of close form styles of poems is seen in his poem, “raise the shade” shown below.

raise the shade

raise the shade
will youse dearie?
rain
wouldn't that

get yer goat but
we don't care do
we dearie we should
worry about the rain

huh
dearie?
yknow
i'm

sorry for awl the
poor girls that
gets up god
knows when every

day of their
lives
aint you,
                    oo-oo.           dearie

not so
hard dear

you're killing me

(e e cummings)

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Haiti Under Rubble from 7.0 Earthquake

Natural disasters whenever and wherever they occur impact on all of our lives. The Good Book says we are our brothers and sisters keepers lead by the Holy Spirit. Hence, we must do our part when disaster shows its ugly face. Any assistance, great or small, given from generous and loving hearts has equal weight. I'm passing on this information I received that Barbadians can go to First Caribbean Bank to donate to the Disaster Relief Fund for Haiti. The banking information is shown below:

First Caribbean Bank Account--2645374-- Cheques can be written to: HELP #2645374

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